I am not drunk!

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Blurred pictures are usually a sign of poor photographic skills unless you create them on purpose. I photographed this mustard flower in my backyard and it looked okay. I used a black backdrop to create a “clean” background. When I looked at the images it looked perfectly executed and still I thought it was an average image. So I started to brain storm and came up with the idea to use a motion blur filter as an overlay and after a few “clicks” I got this picture which I like.

I am preparing a boot camp class on Photoshop in April. If you are interested, please email me (eye2eyephotostudio@ymail.com)

Happy photographing and editing!

The Presbyterian church in Merced

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As much as the rain is welcomed by the farmers in central California so are the clouds by the photographers. I recently started photographing architecture. I am looking for lines and structure. The random shape of clouds are a wonderful contrast to the planned shapes of a building.  Another proof that the background is as important as the foreground and…. sometimes color gets into your way.

Happy photographing!

Depth of Field

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Everyone with a DSLR or any camera with a viewfinder,  should occasionally check to make sure the viewfinder is adjusted to their eye. I wear glasses so this is especially important to me. If it’s not adjusted right when you manually focus on something the focus point will be incorrect. Here I was focusing on the 6 (upside down). This is shot at f5.6. You will note the shallow depth of field.

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This photo on the other hand was shot at f18 with a longer shutter speed of .4 seconds, notice the depth of field is much greater, in fact the wall is almost in focus.  So when you do the test use the largest aperture (smallest number) available to give the most accurate results.

Keep clicking

Blossoms in Carmel, CA

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I photographed this apple blossom (I believe it is an apple blossom) in Carmel, CA. Again, I created three images out of the raw image and combined them as a 32 bit hdr file. Then I edited the tonality and came up with this beauty. If you would like to know more about hdr photography, come to our next photo club meeting in Chowchilla. Go to www.passionforphotos.com for more information.

Happy photographing